How to Answer an Essay Question

In: How to write

How to Answer an Essay Question

To help you formulate your college admission essay, we describe some of the most frequent content essays categories and suggest how they might be approached. Although you will not have to respond to all of these application essays categories, sketch out some notes with respect to each category. Diversity admissions essays:

  1. Career Plans. Very often selection committee wants to know more about your professional aspirations from the application essays. The essay question is asked in the following way, such as, “Tell us about your long-term career goals”. It is easy to ask such admission essays topics if you have already developed a clear career direction as well as you have already chosen a program that is created to train you for the future career.
  2. General Interest Areas. Reading your essays, most admission officers want to know what professional or academic areas interest you. One of such essay writing questions may sound like “What are your academic interests?”
  3. Academic Background and Achievements. These are common admission essays topics. Such essays questions require an overview of your history before entering the college. Before answering such essay questions make a list of the most memorable academic experiences in your life, associated activities, awards or honors. Then writing an essay, describe them in attractive way.

Admission Essay Writing Sample

…In Cornell's Urban Semester Program, I worked at the Women and Children's Health Center in Queens. I visited the community with outreach workers and physicians to provide care to the people of the Ravenswood and Queens Bridge Housing Projects. I gathered information and conducted health-related workshops. I summarized my findings in a paper called “Health Care Issues in an Undeserved Community.” Graduating from Cornell, I was named a Recognition Tradition Fellow (the school’s highest honor for college and community contributions), and a scholarship was named after me.

At Mount Sinai I immediately conducted workshops on health issues like breast cancer and the dangers of smoking for the East Harlem community. I became involved in the Mount Sinai Moms Program (for teenage mothers). Not only was I a lecturer, but I was also confidante and friend to many of the young women. As a mentor for the Mount Sinai Scholars Program, I spent at least one hour a week with a New York City high school student who is now away in college...